Rise of a Franchise?

Sullivan Stapleton stars as Greek general Themistocles in director Noam Murro's follow-up to 2006's "300." Photo courtesy of Warner Brothers and Legendary Films.

Sullivan Stapleton stars as Greek general Themistocles in director Noam Murro’s follow-up to 2006’s “300.” Photo courtesy of Warner Brothers and Legendary Films.

With the death of the main characters, a sequel to Zack Snyder’s 300 seems far fetched, almost as ridiculous as a proposed Gladiator sequel that almost happened. However, 300: Rise of an Empire manages to be an entertaining, bloody good time.

The movie is not a sequel, or even a prequel, to the original film. The best way to describe it is as a “parallelquel,” a story that takes place along side the Battle of Thermopylae.  While the film occasionally returns to the 300 Spartans, its focus is on Themistocles (Sullivan Stapleton), an Athenian general who fought at the Battle of Marathon.

During that battle – according to the movie, not history – Themistocles shot the arrow that killed Persia’s King Darius I and set in motion the rise of Xerxes. Years pass and Themistocles is a politician in Athens who rallies men to fight the Persian onslaught. Meanwhile, Xerxes (Rodrigo Santoro), now the god of bling bling, has assigned general Artemisia (Eva Green) to engage the Greeks by sea.

Unlike 300, Rise is mainly the story of Greece’s naval battles with Persia, focusing on the battles of Artemisium and Salamis.  The battles are dramatic and visually gorgeous. Like the original, Rise has the look of a graphic novel – although the visuals here look more like Immortals – but the color palette is richer than 300’s sepia and blood swathed filters. The style of 300 has been stolen and used too much since the film’s release. Starz’ Spartacus series used it to good effect. I enjoyed Immortals. However, Renny Harlin’s The Legend of Hercules and Paul W.S. Anderson’s Pompeii looked cheap. I recently re-watched Troy, which used a classic, realistic look. I miss that look. But Rise has more right than any film to use the visual style of 300.

Zack Snyder, busy making films about another hero in a red cape, serves as co-writer for Rise. Noam Murro takes over the reigns well, creating a mythic vision of Greece as the cradle of democracy and heroes. He adds more blood and gore to his film, although most of the CGI blood disappears into the digital ether.

Eva Green stars as Artemisia, the only Persian fleet commander discussed in detail by Herodotus. Although portrayed as a villain in the film, she is a strong female character in a male-dominated story. Photo courtesy of Warner Brothers and Legendary Pictures.

Eva Green stars as Artemisia, the only Persian fleet commander discussed in detail by Herodotus. Although portrayed as a villain in the film, she is a strong female character in a male-dominated story. Photo courtesy of Warner Brothers and Legendary Pictures.

Stapleton is fine as the lead, but he portrays a much different type of leader than Gerard Butler’s Leonidas. Themistocles is a more practical man and not obsessed with the beautiful death the Spartans considered a holy experience. Although she is handed some silly dialogue, Green stands above the chaos as Artemisa, the Persian general.  Both Eva Green and Lena Headey, returning as Queen Gorgo, portray strong women, capable of leading. If only Green didn’t spend so much time staring into nothingness. Since the film is more concerned with hero worship than historical accuracy, it never mentions that both of these figures were strong women outside the normal Greek social structures, which demanded that women stay home and not be a part of society.

I hope Rise sets off a franchise of films based in this fictional version of ancient Greece. What’s next? That would have to be the Battle of Plataea, the one that ended the war.  Xenophon’s The Persian Expedition is another great one. Why that has not been adapted to film is a mystery to me. It’s a great story with action and drama. Finally, Snyder and company can tackle Alexander the Great, but make it more exciting and comprehendible than Oliver Stone’s misguided film.

Rise is not a smart movie, or a historical document. Like 300, it takes Greek history and adds a dash of fantasy, creating a mythology that makes sense within the two films.  I don’t go to these expecting to be educated. I want to be entertained. And 300: Rise of an Empire entertained.

Copyright 2014 Tony George

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One Comment

  1. Good review Tony. I hope this doesn’t spur on a whole other movie, but then again, if they do happen to get another one made and presented to the mass-audiences, I’ll still probably go to see it anyway. They are fun movies, after all.

    Reply

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